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LinkedIn bug let anyone add fictional job listings for any company

LinkedIn bug let anyone add fictional job listings for any company

I wonder which high-profile CEO is being replaced today… BAD NEWS FOR ANYONE who applied to be Google CEO last week. The job, which appeared on both the company’s LinkedIn page and in Google Jobs, never existed, and was someone exploiting a bug. Sudar Pichai is safe in the post, so let’s hope he found

I wonder which high-profile CEO is being replaced today…

BAD NEWS FOR ANYONE who applied to be Google CEO last week. The job, which appeared on both the company’s LinkedIn page and in Google Jobs, never existed, and was someone exploiting a bug. Sudar Pichai is safe in the post, so let’s hope he found that out before sending a company-wide middle finger and leaving a present on his desk for his non-existent replacement.

The job was the handiwork of Dutch recruiter Michel Rijnders, who put a post on LinkedIn explaining the loophole, as well as posting jobs for both Google and LinkedIn CEOs to the respective company pages as proof of concept.

As well as being able to cause investor panic at the drop of the hat, the bug could have more serious implications. As part of the process of adding a job to a company’s page, the fake recruiter could also direct applicants to an external site making it the kind of phishing opportunity that scammers only dream of: an official-looking link to a fake website.

Unsurprisingly, LinkedIn closed this pretty quickly, probably confused by the sudden interest in CEO Jeff Weiner’s position. “This issue was caused by a bug in our online jobs experience that allowed members to edit the company after a job had already been posted,” the company said in a statement to AdWeek

“The issue has now been resolved. Fraudulent job postings are a clear violation of our terms of service. When they are brought to our attention, we quickly move to take them down. While we do allow companies to post on behalf of other companies (such as in the case of recruiting firms), this is only permitted with the knowledge of both parties.”

Weirdly, Rijnders was also able to post the job free of charge, despite this being very much a paid feature. That bit, however, was intentional, the company said: it’s currently running a test where small and midsize businesses can post a small number of jobs without charge. “This member was a part of that test.”

Still, good news for phone boxes everywhere: for the briefest of moments, they were only the second sketchiest place to respond to help wanted signs. Time to bust out a LinkedIn celebratory emoji. µ



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Susan E. Lopez
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