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SpaceX delays launch of ISS resupply mission due to technical issues

SpaceX delays launch of ISS resupply mission due to technical issues

The launch of CRS-17 has been delayed several times since 26th April Elon Musk’s SpaceX has postponed the launch of the CRS-17 resupply mission to the International Space Station (ISS) for 24 hours, due to ‘technical issues’. SpaceX’s Dragon cargo spacecraft was scheduled to lift off aboard a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral Air

SpaceX delays launch of ISS resupply mission due to technical issues

The launch of CRS-17 has been delayed several times since 26th April

Elon Musk’s SpaceX has postponed the launch of the CRS-17 resupply mission to the International Space Station (ISS) for 24 hours, due to ‘technical issues’.

SpaceX’s Dragon cargo spacecraft was scheduled to lift off aboard a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida at 03:11 Eastern Time on Friday, but the company decided to scrub the mission just 15 minutes ahead of launch. This was due to a helium ‘Quick Disconnect’ issue on the Falcon 9 rocket’s second stage and loss of power at the drone ship landing pad.

According to Space.com, the mission will now launch on Saturday at 02:48 Eastern Time. The US Air Force’s 45th Weather Squadron predicts a 70 per cent chance of good weather on Saturday.

The launch of CRS-17 mission has been delayed several times since 26th April, when Falcon 9 was originally slated to lift off and to take the cargo supply to the ISS.

Earlier on Wednesday, a power issue on the ISS forced NASA to postpone the launch until 3rd May. The space station lost power on Monday, forcing it to run on about 75 per cent of its normal supply. The crew rerouted electricity from other lines and then worked to reinstate full functionality.

Yesterday, NASA officials announced that all electrical problems on the ISS had been resolved, and the space station was in perfect condition to support the CRS-17 launch.

When launched, CRS-17 will be SpaceX’s 17th supply mission for the American space agency. The capsule will carry about 2,482 kilograms of supplies and equipment to the ISS, including several science experiments as well as equipment to map CO2 in Earth’s atmosphere.

One of the many science experiments being sent to the ISS is ‘Tissue Chips in Space’ that will use human tissue cultures to probe how cells respond to diseases and drugs in the microgravity environment.

Another experiment, dubbed Photobioreactor, will investigate the feasibility of using biological processes as part of the life support system during long-duration missions in deep space.

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