728 x 90

‘Super Blood Wolf Moon’ to be visible across Europe and North America on Sunday night

‘Super Blood Wolf Moon’ to be visible across Europe and North America on Sunday night

A lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes through the Earth’s shadow. Credit: NASA People across the world will have a chance to watch a Super Blood Moon and a total lunar eclipse on 20-21 January this year. Eclipses occur when the Sun, the Moon and Earth align. A lunar eclipse takes place only when

Total lunar eclipse 2019: 'Super Blood Wolf Moon' to be visible across Europe and North America on Sunday night

A lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes through the Earth’s shadow. Credit: NASA

People across the world will have a chance to watch a Super Blood Moon and a total lunar eclipse on 20-21 January this year.

Eclipses occur when the Sun, the Moon and Earth align. A lunar eclipse takes place only when there is a full Moon, and when the Moon passes through the Earth’s shadow. During a total lunar eclipse, the Moon, Earth and the Sun are perfectly lined up.

The Supermoon occurs when the Moon is at the closest point to Earth in its monthly orbit.

The Super Blood Moon is the phenomenon in which the Moon appears slightly larger and brighter, with a reddish glow. As January’s full moon is also dubbed as the Wolf Moon, the upcoming event on Sunday night is also being referred to as the ‘Super Blood Wolf Moon’ of 2019.

The event will be visible for its entirety in North and South America, as well as a large part of Europe and Africa.

According to NASA, the penumbral phase of the eclipse will begin at 6.36pm Pacific Standard Time (PST) or 9.36pm Eastern Standard Time (EST) on 20 January. 

For the next 57 minutes, the Moon will continue to move deeper into the penumbra. At 7.33pm PST (10.33pm EST), the edge of the Moon will start entering the umbra.

At 8.41pm PST (11.41pm EST), the entire Moon will be inside the umbra, marking the start of the most-anticipated part of the eclipse – totality or the total lunar eclipse.

At this point, the Moon will begin to turn rusty orange or reddish-orange in colour. It happens because of same light scattering effect, which causes the sunrises and sunsets to appear reddish-orange. However, presence of clouds, ash, dust, organic materials and photochemical droplets in the atmosphere can have some impact on how Moon appears during the eclipse.

At 9.12pm PST (12.12am EST), the moment of greatest eclipse will occur. At that point, the Moon will be halfway through the umbra. The edge of the Moon will begin to come of the umbra at 9.43pm PST (12.43am EST), marking the end of the total lunar eclipse phase.

Eventually, the Moon will move out of the umbra and penumbra, and the eclipse will end at 11.48pm (2.48am EST).

Those who miss this opportunity to view the total lunar eclipse will need to wait until 26 May 2021, when next total lunar eclipse occurs.

Further reading

[ad_2]

Source link

Susan E. Lopez
ADMINISTRATOR
PROFILE

Posts Carousel

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Latest Posts

Top Authors

Most Commented

Featured Videos