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Trump joins the Queen to honour D-Day veterans

Trump joins the Queen to honour D-Day veterans

Donald and Melania Trump have landed in Portsmouth to stand alongside the Queen, Theresa May, Emmanuel Macron, Angela Merkel and 300 heroes who survived D-Day to mark the 75th anniversary of the invasion of France. The President is on the third day of his state visit to Britain and is taking part in a ceremony on the south coast

Donald and Melania Trump have landed in Portsmouth to stand alongside the Queen, Theresa MayEmmanuel Macron, Angela Merkel and 300 heroes who survived D-Day to mark the 75th anniversary of the invasion of France.

The President is on the third day of his state visit to Britain and is taking part in a ceremony on the south coast with the allies who helped defeat Hitler after a whirlwind 48 hours where he attended a glittering state banquet at Buckingham Palace and held talks in Downing Street. 

Today hundreds of veterans stood with the Queen, the Prime Minister and President Trump 75 years ago, followed by a reception hosted by Prince Charles ahead of more events in France tomorrow.

Tens of thousands also gathered at the Portsmouth Naval Memorial on Southsea Common for the event which marks the 75th anniversary of the biggest amphibious invasion in military history.

On June 5 1944, US General Dwight D. Eisenhower, the Supreme Allied Commander in Europe, gave the final order to invade German-occupied France with the message: ‘The eyes of the world are upon you’.

Within hours the allied fleet of 2,700 ships was sent out of British ports all along the south of England – the biggest armada the world had ever seen – with the area around the Isle of Wight nicknamed ‘Piccadilly Circus’ – before sailing across the Channel as paratroopers were dropped into France.

From dawn on June 6 – known as the Longest Day – 156,000 troops stormed Normandy’s beaches and smashed Hitler’s Nazis, turning the Second World War in the allies’ favour and leading to the liberation of Europe.

It is considered the turning point of the Second World War – but Operation Overlord also led to thousands dying and tens of thousands being injured. 

President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump arrive to participate in an event to commemorate the 75th anniversary of D-Day, in Portsmouth today

President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump arrive to participate in an event to commemorate the 75th anniversary of D-Day, in Portsmouth today

Mr Trump travelled around an hour by helicopter from London on the third and final day of his state visit to Britain

Mr Trump travelled around an hour by helicopter from London on the third and final day of his state visit to Britain

The Queen waves to crowds from the back of her limousine as world leaders gathered on the south coast today

The Queen waves to crowds from the back of her limousine as world leaders gathered on the south coast today

Marine One comes in to land a Trump joined world leaders and the Queen to mark the anniversary

Marine One comes in to land a Trump joined world leaders and the Queen to mark the anniversary

Mrs May will be making her final official appearances as the British Prime Minister during the D-Day commemorations which continue on Thursday across Normandy.

Day three of the Trump state visit to Britain

9.35am: Trump and his wife Melania fly to Portsmouth from London for events to commemorate the 75th anniversary of D-Day

10.45am: Leaders will gather for the start of events

12.45pm: The Trumps will join the Queen to meet D-Day Veterans followed by a lunch reception held by Prince Charles.

3.30pm: The President and First Lady fly to Ireland where they will meet Taoiseach Leo Varadkar before staying at Mr Trump’s Doonbeg luxury hotel in Clare.

Meanwhile, hundreds of veterans are flocking to northern France and Portsmouth as well as to events around the country to mark the occasion.

On Wednesday Mrs May will host 15 world leaders and representatives in the Hampshire port city.

The event will be the first time the UK has hosted this many world leaders outside a formal summit since the 2012 Olympics.

A mass security operation has been launched in the wake of Mr Trump’s attendance at the event – as part of his UK state visit.

Some critics have claimed his presence draws focus away from the veterans.

Representatives from every country that fought alongside the UK in Operation Overlord – the Battle of Normandy – will attend commemorations as well as The Prince of Wales, members of the armed forces and the veterans who are all over 90 years old.

Joining Mrs May will also be French president Emmanuel Macron, the German chancellor Angela Merkel as well as prime ministers from Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Belgium, Czech Republic, Greece, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Slovakia and Denmark.

Mrs May is expected to describe the landings as a ‘moment of historic international cooperation’ in which veterans fought for liberty and peace.

US National Security Advisor John Bolton arrived at the D-Day event ahead of the President of the Unites States

US National Security Advisor John Bolton arrived at the D-Day event ahead of the President of the Unites States

Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn (R) speaks with outgoing Liberal Democratic Patry leader Vince Cable (L) as they arrive to attend an event to commemorate the 75th anniversary

Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon speaks to the SNP's Westminster leader Ian Blackford

Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn (R) speaks with outgoing Liberal Democrat leader Vince Cable (L) as they arrive to attend an event to commemorate the 75th anniversary. Scotland’s First Minister Nicola Sturgeon speaks to the SNP’s Westminster leader Ian Blackford

She will call for unity in western Europe, adding: ‘The global challenges we face today are different in their origin and nature. But as we confront new and evolving threats to our security it is more important than ever that we continue to stand together in upholding our shared values and way of life.

‘As I host leaders from around the world today to mark this significant moment in our shared history, we will together reflect on the continued importance of the western alliance for all our countries’ security and prosperity.’

An hour-long production telling the story of the invasion will be played to the crowds featuring testimony from veterans before theatrical performances, live music as well as a flypast of the Red Arrows and Spitfires take place.

As part of the performance Mrs May will read a letter written by Captain Norman Skinner of the Royal Army Service Corps to his wife Gladys on 3 June 1944. The letter was in his pocket when he landed on Sword Beach on June 6 1944. He was killed the next day, leaving behind his wife and two young daughters.

Afterwards world leaders will meet to discuss the western alliance and security after a reception with veterans.

From the deck of the aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth, Mrs May and Defence Secretary Penny Mordaunt will wave off the crowds of veterans who are set to retrace the journey they made across the channel 75 years ago. This time they will be followed by a flotilla of Royal Navy vessels.

More than 4,000 personnel will be involved in D-Day events in the UK and France, in what is set to be one of the biggest mobilisations of the UK Armed Forces in recent history.

Veterans travelling on the MV Boudicca, a cruise ship chartered by the Royal British Legion to take more than 250 fellow veterans to the 75th Anniversary of D-Day commemorations, disembark in Portsmouth today

Veterans travelling on the MV Boudicca, a cruise ship chartered by the Royal British Legion to take more than 250 fellow veterans to the 75th Anniversary of D-Day commemorations, disembark in Portsmouth today

Royal Air Force personnel attend the D-Day 75 Commemorations where the political heads of the 16 countries involved gathered

Royal Air Force personnel attend the D-Day 75 Commemorations where the political heads of the 16 countries involved gathered

Later in the afternoon veterans Harry Read, 95, and John Hutton, 94, will parachute into Normandy in honour of comrades they lost when they first made the descent 75 years ago.

Alongside around 280 paratroopers they will take part in the jump onto fields at Sannerville – the drop zone for the 8th Midlands Parachute Battalion during D-Day.

In the evening, a vigil and silent march will take place at Pegasus Bridge which was the scene of a 15-minute skirmish to take hold of the pathways over the Caen Canal and River Orne. This was one of the first places British troops liberated on D-Day.

Last night Mr Trump hosted Prince Charlesn and Camilla at an intimate 60-person black tie dinner at the official residence of the US Ambassador, Winfield House in Regent’s Park. 

In contrast to the sophisticated Palace menu which included steamed halibut and strawberry sable, – and was served with a £2,000-a-bottle Chateau Lafite – last night’s fare was closer to the heart of the teetotal President with a taste for plain food: beef, potatoes, ice cream, and £30-a-bottle Californian red wine.  

Charles and Camilla were guests of the US Ambassador to the UK, Robert ‘Woody’ Johnson and his wife Suzanne Ircha, at their official residence for what is known as a ‘return dinner’ in honour of the US president.

The Trumps patiently waited outside for Charles and Camilla to arrive before they swept up in a chauffeur-driven car. Camilla looked elegant in in a white evening gown by Fiona Clare with a pretty embroidered overlay and a bejewelled necklace – a contrast to Melania’s striking red cape-style £5,610 Givenchy gown and loose, dark locks.

President Trump’s children also joined the dinner, Ivanka wearing a white off-the-shoulder gown and her hair in a chignon. His younger daughter, Tiffany, wore a grey full-length dress.

Donald Trump was gifted this hat made by Sir Winston's CHurchill's favourite hatter in London. He wore it but admitted Churchill looked better

Donald Trump was gifted this hat made by Sir Winston's CHurchill's favourite hatter in London. He wore it but admitted Churchill looked better

Donald Trump was gifted this hat made by Sir Winston’s CHurchill’s favourite hatter in London. He wore it but admitted Churchill looked better

Prince Charles and Donald Trump gave one another warm toasts and clinked glasses at the Winfield House dinner

Prince Charles and Donald Trump gave one another warm toasts and clinked glasses at the Winfield House dinner

Mrs Trump chatted with Suzanne Ircha, wife of the US Ambassador, and Camilla before the meal. Mr Trump famously is a teetotaler who encourages his family and associates not to partake. The Duchess however was seen with a glass of wine

Mrs Trump chatted with Suzanne Ircha, wife of the US Ambassador, and Camilla before the meal. Mr Trump famously is a teetotaler who encourages his family and associates not to partake. The Duchess however was seen with a glass of wine

Camilla and Charles, and Donald and Melania Trump, photographed shortly before the dinner began inside Winfield House

Camilla and Charles, and Donald and Melania Trump, photographed shortly before the dinner began inside Winfield House

 

Normally the Lord Mayor of London would hold his own banquet on the second night of a state visit by a foreign leader.

But when it comes to US presidents, it has become something of a tradition for the royals to dine at the glorious 1930s Grade II-listed Winfield House in Regent’s Park.

Guests at the black tie dinner dined on fresh burrata cheese with heritage tomatoes, basil, and Maldon salt; then grilled fillet of beef with pommes Anna, watercress pure, celeriac and chantenay carrots; followed by summer berries, homemade vanilla ice cream with Muscovado sugar tuile.

The setting was far more intimate than for the state banquet at Buckingham Palace on Monday night. The house’s dining room was set with six tables each with around ten places.

A smiling Queen welcomes Donald Trump for lunch at Buckingham Palace with other senior royals including her son Charles

A smiling Queen welcomes Donald Trump for lunch at Buckingham Palace with other senior royals including her son Charles

Donald Trump and the Queen toast one another at the State Banquet welcoming the US President as the two mark the impending D-Day anniversary

Donald Trump and the Queen toast one another at the State Banquet welcoming the US President as the two mark the impending D-Day anniversary

Mr Trump sat on one table with Charles and Theresa May on either side of him. There were no speeches, unlike the previous evening, but the prince and the President both gave brief toasts.

Earlier on Tuesday, Prime Minister Theresa May gave the president a private tour of the underground bunker where Winston Churchill led the country during the Second World War. 

Mr Trump was presented with a framed typescript draft of the 1941 Atlantic Charter, agreed by president Franklin D. Roosevelt and Sir Winston, that set out their vision for the post-war world. 

Trump and First Lady Melania landed at Buckingham Palace at lunchtime after flying into Stansted in the morning following an overnight flight in Air Force One from Joint Base Andrews near Washington DC.

Hundreds of thousands of anti-Trump protesters have promised to bring London to a standstill – but they have so far failed to materialise as 20,000 police officers swamped the capital.  

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn led demonstrations in the capital today, after boycotting the State Banquet last night.  

One Donald Trump supporter was doused in milkshake by angry protesters. The semi-retired grandfather, who wishes to withhold his name, told MailOnline he was peacefully debating with ‘moderate lefties’ and ‘having a laugh with the majority of them’ before the demonstration turned violent.

Video footage from the scene shows a number of anti-Trump marchers shouting ‘Nazi scum’ at the Londoner before throwing the cold beverage at him.

The man then says he is ‘here to stay’ before throwing the cup back at protesters as one police officer attempts to stop the incident from turning into a brawl.  

Donald Trump Jr shared this shot of his father, First Lady Melania and Ivanka Trump touring the Churchill War Rooms with Theresa and Philip May

Donald Trump Jr shared this shot of his father, First Lady Melania and Ivanka Trump touring the Churchill War Rooms with Theresa and Philip May 

Ivanka, Tiffany, Donald Jr, Eric and his wife Lara were all brought along for the VIP tour of London's Imperial War Museum on the second day of the president's three-day trip in the UK

Ivanka, Tiffany, Donald Jr, Eric and his wife Lara were all brought along for the VIP tour of London’s Imperial War Museum on the second day of the president’s three-day trip in the UK

Pictured: Donald and Ivanka Trump with Theresa May's husband, Philip, in the Churchill War Rooms this afternoon

Pictured: Donald and Ivanka Trump with Theresa May’s husband, Philip, in the Churchill War Rooms this afternoon 

The ugly scenes followed an evening of pomp and pageantry on Monday night, when the Royals hosted Trump for a State Banquet.  

The Queen granted the President the greatest honour that can be bestowed upon a visiting world leader in the ballroom of Buckingham Palace.

Both spoke of the special relationship between the US and the UK as the countries look to commemorate those who gave their lives on D-Day in World War Two. 

In front of about 170 guests, Trump thanked the monarch for her ‘gracious hospitality’ and ‘nearly seven decades’ of personal friendship with the United States.

He spoke of the Blitz and the bombing of Buckingham Palace, saying that ‘in their dark hour the people of this nation showed the world what it means to be British’.

Praising the Queen a ‘great, great woman’, Trump recalled her service on the Home Front during the war, and said ‘the bond between our nations was forever sealed in that great crusade’. He said the Queen embodied ‘the spirit of dignity, duty, and patriotism that beats proudly in every British heart’.

Raising his glass the 45th President of the United States said: ‘On behalf of all Americans, I offer a toast to the eternal friendship of our people, the vitality of our nations and to the long cherished and truly remarkable reign of Her Majesty, the Queen.’

President Trump (pictured with Theresa May today) has said that he is committed to a 'phenomenal' trade deal as the UK prepares to leave the EU

President Trump (pictured with Theresa May today) has said that he is committed to a ‘phenomenal’ trade deal as the UK prepares to leave the EU 

The Trumps and the Mays all smile as the President yells to reporters in Downing Street on day 2 of his state visit to Britain

The Trumps and the Mays all smile as the President yells to reporters in Downing Street on day 2 of his state visit to Britain

Mr Trump says a loud 'hi' to the outgoing Prime Minister and her husband just days before she is set to quit as Tory leader but remain in No 10 as a caretaker PM

Mr Trump says a loud ‘hi’ to the outgoing Prime Minister and her husband just days before she is set to quit as Tory leader but remain in No 10 as a caretaker PM

A 16ft talking robot of US President Donald Trump sitting on a gold toilet heads from Trafalgar Square down Whitehall for Parliament Square

A 16ft talking robot of US President Donald Trump sitting on a gold toilet heads from Trafalgar Square down Whitehall for Parliament Square 

President Donald Trump's limousine, known as The Beast, (circled in red) passes the inflatable blimp depicting him as a baby in a nappy on Parliament Square

President Donald Trump’s limousine, known as The Beast, (circled in red) passes the inflatable blimp depicting him as a baby in a nappy on Parliament Square

  

 

D-Day: How Operation Overlord saw 156,000 Allied troops land and turned the tide of war in Europe

Operation Overlord saw some 156,000 Allied troops landing in Normandy on June 6, 1944.

It is thought as many as 4,400 were killed in an operation Winston Churchill described as ‘undoubtedly the most complicated and difficult that has ever taken place’.

The assault was conducted in two phases: an airborne landing of 24,000 British, American, Canadian and Free French airborne troops shortly after midnight, and an amphibious landing of Allied infantry and armoured divisions on the coast of France commencing at 6.30am.

The operation was the largest amphibious invasion in world history, with over 160,000 troops landing. Some 195,700 Allied naval and merchant navy personnel in over 5,000 ships were involved.

The operation was the largest amphibious invasion in world history, with over 160,000 troops landing. Some 195,700 Allied naval and merchant navy personnel in over 5,000 ships were involved. 

The operation was the largest amphibious invasion in world history, with over 160,000 troops landing. Some 195,700 Allied naval and merchant navy personnel in over 5,000 ships were involved. 

The landings took place along a 50-mile stretch of the Normandy coast divided into five sectors: Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno and Sword.

The assault was chaotic with boats arriving at the wrong point and others getting into difficulties in the water.

Troops managed only to gain a small foothold on the beach – but they built on their initial breakthrough in the coming days and a harbour was opened at Omaha.

They met strong resistance from the German forces who were stationed at strongpoints along the coastline.

Approximately 10,000 allies were injured or killed, inlcuding 6,603 American, of which 2,499 were fatal.

Between 4,000 and 9,000 German troops were killed – and it proved the pivotal moment of the war, in the allied forces’ favour.

The first wave of troops from the US Army takes cover under the fire of Nazi guns in 1944

The first wave of troops from the US Army takes cover under the fire of Nazi guns in 1944

The poignant moment divers lay a wreath on the bed of the Channel in memory of the D-Day heroes who died at sea as world leaders prepare to converge on Normandy to commemorate the 75th anniversary

Divers today laid a wreath on the bed of the English Channel in a poignant tribute to a group of soldiers who died on the eve of D-Day, as world leaders prepare to converge on Normandy to commemorate the 75th anniversary. 

The ring of poppies was left among the remains of seven DD Valentine tanks that fell off a boat and sank during a disastrous practice run of the landings in April 1944, claiming the lives of six Royal Dragoon Guards members. 

Exercise Smash simulated the landing of thousands of armoured vehicles on the Normandy beaches, but the disaster at Studland Bay in Dorset persuaded commanders to scrap the plans and land them further on shore. 

Divers left a wreath among the remains of seven DD Valentine tanks that sank in Studland Bay, Dorset, during a disastrous practice run of the landings in April 1944, claiming the lives of six members of the Royal Dragoon Guards

Divers left a wreath among the remains of seven DD Valentine tanks that sank in Studland Bay, Dorset, during a disastrous practice run of the landings in April 1944, claiming the lives of six members of the Royal Dragoon Guards

Six servicemen - Lieutenant C Gould, Sergeant V Hartley, Corporals Arthur Park and V Townson and Troopers A Kirby and E Petty - all drowned. Pictured: The wreath being laid at the spot today

Six servicemen – Lieutenant C Gould, Sergeant V Hartley, Corporals Arthur Park and V Townson and Troopers A Kirby and E Petty – all drowned. Pictured: The wreath being laid at the spot today 

Their soldiers' deaths were kept secret for decades but a memorial to those who died was erected to mark the 60th anniversary of Operation Smash in 2004

The wreath on the bottom of Studland Bay

Their soldiers’ deaths were kept secret for decades but a memorial to those who died was erected to mark the 60th anniversary of Operation Smash in 2004

The early morning tribute to the victims of Exercise Smash was organised by Paul Pettitt, 53, who has campaigned for the tanks to get special protection

The early morning tribute to the victims of Exercise Smash was organised by Paul Pettitt, 53, who has campaigned for the tanks to get special protection

The remains of seven tanks now lie 60ft beneath the waves on Studland Bay, 75 years after the ill-fated Operation Smash.

The remains of seven tanks now lie 60ft beneath the waves on Studland Bay, 75 years after the ill-fated Operation Smash.

Thousands of veterans will join a service in remembrance of the landings in Normandy, while President Trump and Prime Minister Theresa May will gather for another event in Portsmouth starting at 11am.

The early morning tribute to the victims of Exercise Smash was organised by Paul Pettitt, 53, who has campaigned for the tanks to get special protection. 

‘We enlisted the help of local divers and over twenty divers went out and laid wreaths on each of the tanks,’ he said. 

‘It was a great success as we managed to lay wreaths on all the six tanks where we think men may have been lost. We tried to visit the seventh tank but it was too rough.’ 

The sandy shoreline of Studland Bay was chosen for a live-firing practice for D-Day because it was almost identical to the beaches at Normandy.

Soldiers from the US 75th Ranger Regiment in uniform stand on the overlook after climbing the cliffs of Pointe-du-Hoc

Soldiers from the US 75th Ranger Regiment in uniform stand on the overlook after climbing the cliffs of Pointe-du-Hoc

Rangers from the 75th Ranger Regiment old the American flag after scaling the cliffs in Cricqueville-en-Bessin, Normandy

Rangers from the 75th Ranger Regiment old the American flag after scaling the cliffs in Cricqueville-en-Bessin, Normandy

Soldiers climb the cliff of Pointe-du-Hoc some 75 years on from the American assault of Omaha and Utah beaches in 1944

Soldiers climb the cliff of Pointe-du-Hoc some 75 years on from the American assault of Omaha and Utah beaches in 1944

During the American assault on June 6 in 1944, US Army Rangers scaled the 100ft cliffs to seize German artillery pieces

During the American assault on June 6 in 1944, US Army Rangers scaled the 100ft cliffs to seize German artillery pieces

In 1944, the Rangers scaled the 100ft cliffs to seize German artillery that could have fired on the American landing troops

In 1944, the Rangers scaled the 100ft cliffs to seize German artillery that could have fired on the American landing troops

The troops were recreating a journey taken by the US Army's 2nd and 5th Ranger Battalions to destroy Nazi guns on the cliffs

The troops were recreating a journey taken by the US Army’s 2nd and 5th Ranger Battalions to destroy Nazi guns on the cliffs

Also the surrounding area was largely unpopulated so it was considered safe to fire into land without the risk of harming civilians. 

At dawn on April 4, 1944 the 4th/7th Royal Dragoon Guards launched their floating Valentine tanks.

The weather soon deteriorated and the tanks were overcome by the waves and sank 60ft to the seabed.

Six servicemen – Lieutenant C Gould, Sergeant V Hartley, Corporals Arthur Park and V Townson and Troopers A Kirby and E Petty – all drowned.

Their deaths were kept secret for decades but a memorial to those who died was erected to mark the 60th anniversary of Operation Smash in 2004. It lies 60ft beneath the waves. 

Meanwhile, US Army Rangers climbed the jagged cliffs of Normandy’s Pointe du Hoc today to honor the men who scaled them 75 years ago in a valiant D-Day assault.

The operation helped prepare the way for Allied troops landing on beaches to break Hitler's stranglehold on France

The operation helped prepare the way for Allied troops landing on beaches to break Hitler’s stranglehold on France

Soldiers from the US 75th Ranger Regiment stand on the overlook after climbing the cliffs of Pointe-du-Hoc today

Soldiers from the US 75th Ranger Regiment stand on the overlook after climbing the cliffs of Pointe-du-Hoc today

Of the 235 men who took on the cliffs in Normandy in June 1944, only 90 were fit for battle two days later

Of the 235 men who took on the cliffs in Normandy in June 1944, only 90 were fit for battle two days later

Today's event is part of ceremonies in France and Britain marking the 75th anniversary of the D-Day invasion on June 6, 1944

Today’s event is part of ceremonies in France and Britain marking the 75th anniversary of the D-Day invasion on June 6, 1944

US Army Rangers climbed the jagged cliffs of Normandy's Pointe du Hoc to honor the men who scaled them 75 years ago

US Army Rangers climbed the jagged cliffs of Normandy’s Pointe du Hoc to honor the men who scaled them 75 years ago

The 75th Ranger Regiment started mounting the limestone promontory at dawn, pulling themselves up on ropes one by one

The 75th Ranger Regiment started mounting the limestone promontory at dawn, pulling themselves up on ropes one by one

Planes fly over as Rangers of the US 75th Ranger Regiment stand on the overlook after climbing the cliffs of Pointe-du-Hoc

Planes fly over as Rangers of the US 75th Ranger Regiment stand on the overlook after climbing the cliffs of Pointe-du-Hoc

Elderly veterans looked on this morning as members of the 75th Ranger Regiment started mounting the limestone promontory at dawn, pulling themselves up on ropes one by one, seagulls swooping above them.

They recreated a journey taken by the US Army’s 2nd and 5th Ranger Battalions to destroy Nazi guns atop the cliffs. 

The operation helped prepare the way for Allied troops landing on beaches a few miles up the coast to break Hitler’s stranglehold on France.

Of the 235 men who took on the cliffs in 1944, only 90 were fit for battle two days later.

Wednesday’s event was part of extensive ceremonies in France and Britain marking the 75th anniversary of the D-Day invasion on June 6, 1944. 

 

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